Throat Exercise Device for Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Recent research supports the use of oropharyngeal exercises to improve snoring and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).

The concept is to strengthen and tone the muscles of the tongue and throat to prevent them from relaxing and collapsing during sleep. 

Research Studies Demonstrate the Efficiency of Mouth & Neck Exercises for Obstructive Sleep Apnea

"Rationale: Upper airway muscle function plays a major role in maintenance of the upper airway patency and contributes to the genesis of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Preliminary results suggested that oropharyngeal exercises derived from speech therapy may be an effective treatment option for patients with moderate OSAS."

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Oropharyngeal Exercises for OSA

Below are some oropharyngeal exercises for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and snoring:

Exercise 1

With the ISO-CTAR Device pressed under your chin, slowly open and close your mouth as widely as you can.

Exercise 2

Pucker your lips (like a kiss). Hold for a count of 10.

Exercise 3

Say "ooooooo-eeeeeee" Making a tight circle with your lips and then spreading your lips into a big, exaggerated smile.

Exercise 4

Close your lips and press them tightly together, saying "mmmmmm" 

Exercise 5

With the ISO-CTAR Device pressed under your chin, open your mouth and stick out your tongue.  

Exercise 6

With the ISO-CTAR Device pressed under your chin, open your mouth widely and stick out your tongue and try to reach your chin with the tongue tip. Hold for 30-60 seconds.

Exercise 7

With the ISO-CTAR Device pressed under your chin, open your mouth widely and stick out your tongue and try to reach your nose with the tongue tip. Hold for 30-60 seconds.

Exercise 8

Stick out your tongue. Hold a spoon upright against the tip of your extended tongue and try to push it away while your hand holds the spoon in place.

Exercise 9

With the ISO-CTAR Device pressed under your chin, open your mouth widely and repeatedly stick your tongue in and out as fast and far as you can.

Exercise 10

With the ISO-CTAR Device pressed under your chin, open your mouth widely and move the tip of your tongue from corner to corner of your lips (side to side) as quickly as you can.

Exercise 11

With the ISO-CTAR Device pressed under your chin, tuck your chin towards your chest, and move tongue around your lips in a circle as quickly as you can until it is fatigued, and then reverse the direction of the circle and repeat.

Exercise 12

With the ISO-CTAR Device pressed under your chin, tuck your chin towards your chest and while holding that position, open and close your mouth slightly and rapidly until fatigued.

Exercise 13

With the ISO-CTAR Device pressed under your chin, tuck your chin towards your chest and while holding that position, say "Ma-Ma-Ma-Ma" as quickly as possible.

Exercise 14

With the ISO-CTAR Device pressed under your chin, tuck your chin towards your chest and while holding that position, say "La-La-La-La" as quickly as possible.

Exercise 15

With the ISO-CTAR Device pressed under your chin, tuck your chin towards your chest and while holding that position, say "Ka-Ka-Ka-Ka" as quickly as possible. 

Exercise 16

With the ISO-CTAR Device pressed under your chin, tuck your chin towards your chest and while holding that position, say "Kalagaga-Kalagaga-Kalagaga-Kalagaga"  as quickly as possible. 

Exercise 17

Gargle loudly with warm water.

Exercise 18

With the ISO-CTAR Device pressed under your chin, tuck your chin towards your chest and while holding that position, sing musical scales, the vowel sounds (A-E-I-O-U), and simple songs like "Happy Birthday to You" and "Old McDonald Had a Farm".

Exercise 19

With the ISO-CTAR Device pressed under your chin, open your mouth widely and press the tip of your tongue against the roof of your mouth. Then move your tongue to the front of the roof your mouth and then pull your tongue back to the back of the roof of your mouth. Go back and forth until fatigued.

Effects of Oropharyngeal Exercises on Patients with Moderate Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

Kátia C. Guimarães 1 , Luciano F. Drager 1 , Pedro R. Genta 1 , Bianca F. Marcondes 1 , and Geraldo Lorenzi-Filho 1

Author Affiliations

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/rccm.200806-981OC

PubMed: 19234106

Received: June 27, 2008

Accepted: February 19, 2009

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